Why do you trust Mint? Takeaways from a visual survey Demo UX Cases

Why do you trust Mint? Takeaways from a visual survey

Two weeks ago we published four tiny visual surveys to help inspire Usabilla users. Our users and visitors participated in these surveys and shared their feedback on different webpages. We will share the results of these test cases to give you an idea of how these short visual surveys can help you understanding your users. As requested we will start with a selection of the results from the Mint demo case: “Click on the things that make you trust Mint. Please explain why.

We analyzed the results 177 participants in this survey. These participants answered the question with 596 points (3.4 points / participant) and explained with 140 notes (0.8 / participant). We will share four takeaways based on a selection of their feedback.

Heatmap

Press boosts credibility more than a testimonial

Users seem to value the opinion of the press about Mint more than testimonials by their peers. A total of 84 users (48%) of all users clicked in the middle section “Why our users love Mint” and “What the press is saying”. Only 23 users shared that the testimonial from a Mint user made them trust Mint more. The short quotes from Money Magazine, The New York Times, Good Morning America, and PC Magazine impressed users: 74 users (42%) clicked on one of the logo’s or quotes.

Mint-Press-vs-Users

Some quotes from our participants:

“Social Proof, from credible sources who’d I’d expect to raise concerns. Assuming this links to the review, it’s even more credible.”

“references from well known magazines are good too!”

“editor’s choice award sounds awesome”

“good reviews of big names create trust”

“I trust money magazine”

“credible magazine rating”

“Any reference to outside well-known publications help.”

“SociaProof, from credible sources who’d I’d expect to raise concerns.
Assuming this links to the review, it’s even more credibl

Earn trust for free

We all love free. The free mentions and signup buttons were attractive targets for participants.

Signup-button

26 users clicked on the 'Free' call-to-action

13 users clicked on the free label

10 users clicked on the 'free' label

Some quotes from the participants:

“Free package offer is always better. Makes me want to try out the service if I find it interesting”

“Yes – a free try out! However – could be even more clear: “Totally Free”

“I can see if I like it”

Quote, quote, and quote

More than half of all points participants used to mark elements that help to gain trust were external sources. Mint is using quotes from media coverage, reviews, user testimonials, and security certificates to boost credibility. 21% of all users clicked on the reviews and ratings in the header of the page, 13% of all users clicked on the user testimonials, 41% clicked on the quotes from the press, and 30% of all the users clicked one or more of the security certificates in the footer of the page.

External-Trust

Selection of feedback about these sections from users in our test:

“I read Money Magazine and I trust them.”

“reviews and ratings”

“A good indicator that a site is safe”

“Having this logo always makes me feel better about doing business with a website”

“secure website sign #1″

“virus safe and good certifications”

“Testimonials, of course it brings trust. But …. like I said, does Google knows what am I going to eat tonight? ;)

It’s all in the (visual) details

Even the smallest visual details got the attention of participants in the test. A selection of some interesting eye-catchers on the homepage of Mint:

Lock icons

20 points have been placed on top of the small icons in front of the ‘Signup’ and ‘Login’ buttons.

Icons

“The lock is a really good idea. Helps to build a sense of security and that it will be safe to use the site”

“Love locks.”

“lock icon (implies security)”

“Padlock sign!!! Means nothing, but is reassuring anyway.”

Stars

17 users clicked on the stars in the Money Magazine rating.

Money-Magazine

Money-Magazine

“Star ratings tend to attract my attention – step 2 is the source… If that’s cool: That’s cool!”

“positive rating”

“5 stars.. this thing must be good”

Piechart

The piechart is an important eye-catcher for 20% of all users.

Piechart

“charts are appealing”

“good looking chart”

“This pie defines the website, ..”

“Data = credibility”

“Great graphics”

“I’m glad I’m not the only one spending half my income on rent.”

Identity

Multiple users commented on Mint’s brand identity like the logo, visuals, and overall styling.

Logo

“grass + green = positive”

“nice’ font”

“the grass is sothing”

“nice shade, leafs”

“green logo”

“the overall design of the website makes a good impression from the first.”

Want to know more?

Contact us if you want more information about this test case, how we analyzed the results, and for other tips about visual surveys in Usabilla. Send us your message by mail (support@usabilla.com), contact us on Gtalk (support@usabilla.com), or send a tweet to @usabilla. We’re looking forward to helping you to learn more about your users.

4 comments

  1. fritz boyle

    Thanks for sharing these results. I look forward to reading more details. I wonder if the metrics for trust on the Mint site would be the same for other services like ecommerce, news or physical services. I’d be interested in a meta analysis incorporating other financial sites as well.

  2. Pingback: Fondamentaux : notions et pistes à approfondir « Sémiologie & web

  3. Paul Veugen

    @Fritz Thanks! We plan to publish the results of the other three testcases (PollDaddy, HTC, B&N) in the upcoming weeks. A more extensive case study based on this Mint study would be very interesting. Feel free to contact me if you’re interested in setting this up with us.

  4. Aedus

    Interesting to see what you can do with your tool. Great work!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *