Tag Archives: user research

2013_08_15_structured_research Theory

Step By Step Guide To More Structured User Research

User research. A concept that has long found acceptance in most companies. We know that user centered design is important – and there are plenty of different job positions that ensure the user is included in the product development process.

Be it during the initial conceptual phase, or after a product is already for sale – the user decides whether a product is fun, useful, and easy to use – in other words whether or not it will be successful.
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2013_06_18_featured_user_testing_methods Theory

The Top 5 User Testing Methods Of UX Professionals

Have you been wondering what type of user testing technique works best for you? Well, you are not the only one. And thank goodness for Linkedin, I had the great opportunity to get in touch with a few UX influencers to get a sense of their favorite user testing methods. I asked them what type of user testing method they found most efficient. The discussion did not only yield some intriguing results, but offered a pretty diverse list. I found it in great interest to present the discussion to you to get a sense of what user testing methods would be the best fit for your next project.
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2013_05_featured_Portigal Theory

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Interviewing Users

How difficult can it be to ask users the right questions? Why is the kind of user I interview so important? And what are the ways that the interviewer can influence the conversation?

There are more than enough questions that we should ask ourselves about interviewing users before we go out there and ask people all sorts of questions. Today, you get the chance to ask me anything you could possibly want to know about interviewing users. And when I say anything, I mean anything!
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2013_live_examples_featured Theory

10 Easy Ways To Gain Targeted Insights Into The User Behaviour

When optimizing your website for more conversion, there are several factors that matter. Some things, such as the usability and accessibility of your content, can easily be tested and optimized before your site goes live. Then, after launch, there are lots of things that you can measure, such as where people come from, what pages they look at, how long they visit, or where they decide to leave you site.

These insights can be quite interesting and they can certainly help you improve your conversion — if you know how to interpret them. In order to take specific action on any analytical data, you need to understand why people act the way they do on your site. What are their goals? What is their motivation? Why do they leave without making a purchase?
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230511073747usability_testing Theory

Combining In-Person and Remote Research

This article was originally and in full length published on UX Magazine.

In the early 90’s, Jakob Nielsen declared in-person user research as state of the art. “User testing with real users is the most fundamental usability method and is in some sense irreplaceable, since it provides direct information about how people use computers [...]”. Sometimes in-person user research can be logistically impractical or cost prohibitive, so remote user research is often employed as an alternative.

In-person user research has been around the longest, and is still widely used as a great way to gather feedback on websites, advertisements, or software. In-person research usually involves letting users perform tasks on a computer while asking them questions, observing their behaviors and body language, or having them think out loud.

In remote user research, on the other hand, the physical location is no longer important because the research subjects can work independently of the researchers. There are two forms of remote user research: moderated and automated. Moderated tests require the researcher to interact with the participant during the session. During automated tests, the researcher does not interfere, which allows people to participate whenever it fits their personal schedule.
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nate.bolt_ Design

Design Is Not Science: an Interview With Nate Bolt

Nate Bolt is the co-founder and president of Bolt | Peters, a research and design firm specializing in remote usability, user experience, and interaction design. Nate is both a researcher and a designer and he co-authored the book Remote Research.

Anneke had the opportunity to interview Nate for our readers. Here are some great insights into the future of remote research, web design ethics, and other challenges designers face on the Web.
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Reliable User Research and The Click of Recognition Theory

Reliable User Research and The Click of Recognition

The usability data that we collect from remote testing comes in two forms: quantitative and qualitative. We can express quantitative data with numbers, such as how long a user stayed on a page, how many visits a page gets, or by serving up a survey asking users to rate an aspect of a site on a numerical scale. On the other hand, qualitative data is generally expressed in words, such as answers to open ended survey questions. Tests can also collect visual qualitative data such users’ facial expressions, but even then, those are translated into nominal data like “looked frustrated” for analysis and communication purposes.

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