Tag Archives: user-centered design

Screen shot 2012-06-27 at 3.02.21 PM Design

Towards User Centered Design in 5 Steps

It’s nothing new anymore and I bet by now everyone has at some point heard about it: User Centered Design (UCD). UCD is a way of designing with a constant focus on the user. Designers are no longer free to express themselves in their work for any means, but they are forced to focus on what the user will like. OK, so you all understand the idea behind user centered design. But is it really that simple?
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Screen-shot-2012-06-11-at-2.27 Design

Tailor a Perfectly Fitting Website in 6 Steps

A fashion and a web designer have a lot in common. They both design. But they also try to make something that is practical and pretty for their user. They even follow the same steps to get there. However, designing fashion is much more hands-on than designing a website. Fabrics are physically manufactured into a tangible piece of clothing. A web design on the other hand is made of digital pixels that are arranged on a screen. So, where am I getting with this?

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Screen shot 2012-06-27 at 3.11.51 PM Theory

From Plain User Testing to an Integrated UX Approach

This is a guest post from David Barker.

Why is it people are so keen to embrace user testing but reject other user experience design techniques? I have asked myself this question on many occasions. Especially given that the full potential of user testing can only be exploited within a wider UX strategy.

My first thoughts were that it is because user testing can be performed without making any change to the project lifecycle. It can be completed independently without affecting the project plan. In his book The inmates are running the asylum Alan Cooper makes a similar statement. He says: “The main reason why empirical user testing has been widely accepted in the high-tech business is that it fits easily into the existing sequence”.

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SAMSUNG Design

Pen & paper or screen: context switching in design

Which approach to design works best for you? Design is a delicate matter. It is not only a question of taste, but just as much a question of approach. How designers go about their work is highly personal. Almost every approach will be different. At the same time, there is one thing I see all good designers do. They use pen & paper and digital media interchangeably, and they know when to switch between the two.
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Why user-centered design is more efficient than waterfall development methodology (part 2 of 2) Theory

Why user-centered design is more efficient than waterfall development methodology (part 2 of 2)

The second and last part of this article addresses one of the main challenges that User Experience professionals face: how to convince our customers to work under a process of user-centered design (UCD) instead of a waterfall methodology. Based on the same case proposed in the first part of this article I describe where the greater efficiency of the UCD lies and why.
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Why user-centered design is more efficient than waterfall development methodology (part 1 of 2) Theory

Why user-centered design is more efficient than waterfall development methodology (part 1 of 2)

One of the main challenges user experience professionals face is how to convince our customers to work under a process of user-centered design instead of the traditional waterfall methodology. In this article I propose a simple comparative exercise to analyze the economic efficiency of one process over the other.

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How to overcome resistance to the implementation of User-Centered Design Announcements

How to overcome resistance to the implementation of User-Centered Design

Incorporating usability techniques and processes of User-Centered Design (UCD) in companies that are not used to working with them can become a daunting task. Over and over again we hear arguments that justify the rejection and invalidate the possibility of change, even if this is minimal. This article describes the most common arguments we hear, and proposes concrete actions to refute the negatives.

by Doug Savage (www.savagechickens.com)

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