Tag Archives: usabilla

featured Demo UX Cases

User Experience Report: Is Responsive Design the Answer to the Growth in Mobile Devices?

Mobile devices are on the rise, we can see it all around us. Mobile traffic alone rose 81% in 2013. Most of us already own a smart- or iPhone, but tablets are becoming increasingly popular as well (rising 68% in the past year).

This presents a problem for websites. Traditionally there was only a single method of viewing them – via desktops – but a rise in smaller screen sizes presents new challenges. Sites need to be optimized to suit all devices: To suit touch and mouse. Handheld screens and TVs.
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eday Announcements

Emerce eDay – Getting Usabilla out into the Wild

It’s been a crazy couple of months here at Usabilla! The expansion of our team, a new office, and with the first edition of Usabilla Exchange being a great success – we felt it was time to get Usabilla out into the wild. After years of mastering the online-world of inbound marketing and building mediated customer relationships, we were excited to literally leave our office and mingle with our partners in real life.

That’s why we decided to join the Emerce eDay last Thursday here in Amsterdam.
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2012_02_featured_plans_survey How-tos

How to Choose The Right Plan

Over 15.000 marketeers, researchers, designers, and analysts already work with Usabilla to collect feedback, measure performance, and much more. For both beginners and experts in the field, Usabilla offers a simple way to focus on qualitative and quantitative research, to find out what users think and do.

On our Pricing & Signup page we offer our customers different plans to choose from. Depending on the number of tests you want to run simultaneously and the kind of data you want to collect, you might need to bounce between plans. You can upgrade or downgrade your plan at any time, whatever comes out best for you.
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SAMSUNG Design

Pen & paper or screen: context switching in design

Which approach to design works best for you? Design is a delicate matter. It is not only a question of taste, but just as much a question of approach. How designers go about their work is highly personal. Almost every approach will be different. At the same time, there is one thing I see all good designers do. They use pen & paper and digital media interchangeably, and they know when to switch between the two.
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My time as an intern at Usabilla Announcements

My time as an intern at Usabilla

Suzanne helped Usabilla a great deal this summer. Her design skills proved invaluable, most of all in creating user flows and thinking about the user experience of our upcoming backend. It was great to have her as an intern, both on a professional and on a personal level! Suzanne was so kind to write a bit about how she experienced her time here, which you can read below. All the best Suzanne! — The Usabilla team

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Screen shot 2012-04-24 at 5.14.56 PM Design

Different Ways To Approach User Centred Design

User testing. Everyone knows it, everyone does it, or at least knows he should be doing it when creating user interfaces. Over time many different kinds of user testing, such as classic in-lab user testing, remote, or automated user testing, have evolved. They are all based on the same idea: user centred design. And they all have their advantages and their disadvantages. Let’s look into different approaches to user centred design and how the saying ‘many a little makes a mickle’ applies to automated remote user testing.

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Perfectly worded hyperlinks equals better usability and conversion Demo UX Cases

Perfectly worded hyperlinks equals better usability and conversion

A little while ago I devoted myself to the wording of hyperlinks. I set up a case study in order to find out if wording influences our users’ action, success rates, and their perception of our website. We tested three versions of the ‘About NESCAFÉ’ page, with generic, informative, and intriguing wording. Results show that generic and informative wording increased the chance of finding information, while the intriguing wording was more catchy and appealing.

Figure 1 - Informative version, interesting elements


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