Tag Archives: usability

Screen-shot-2012-06-27-at-3.45.33-PM Design

The ABC of Usability – Part 9

The latest installment in our monthly list of User Experience terms.

Each month, we are adding new terms to our existing glossary of Usability and UX definitions; terms we deem useful, interesting or – hopefully – a mixture of the two!

Discover new terms, learn more of the ones you thought you knew and find out interesting, little known, details.
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2013_02_usability_ecommerce_featured Theory

Is Your eCommerce Website Suffering From Usability Issues?

The usability of your ecommerce site can make or break potential sales. How can you tell if usability is an issue and, more importantly, how can you improve it? First, give it a go yourself. It’s probably been awhile since you’ve used your site like a customer. Navigate the steps through your customer’s eyes and see how difficult it is to find items. Making your website more user friendly should be a continuous process — never assume that your site can’t be improved. After all, each incomplete order may be tied to a potential customer you may never get back.
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2013_live_examples_featured Theory

10 Easy Ways To Gain Targeted Insights Into The User Behaviour

When optimizing your website for more conversion, there are several factors that matter. Some things, such as the usability and accessibility of your content, can easily be tested and optimized before your site goes live. Then, after launch, there are lots of things that you can measure, such as where people come from, what pages they look at, how long they visit, or where they decide to leave you site.

These insights can be quite interesting and they can certainly help you improve your conversion — if you know how to interpret them. In order to take specific action on any analytical data, you need to understand why people act the way they do on your site. What are their goals? What is their motivation? Why do they leave without making a purchase?
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2013_01_typography_jarrod_featured Theory

Web Designers Need To Remember Typography Influences Usability

Whether your web design skills were acquired through formal education or self-taught learning, there is one aspect of design that commonly gets overlooked — typography. In the following, we’ll take a look at what typography really is, why it affects the usability of your website, and how you can use typography to rise your design to the next level.
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2012_10_featured_Jessica Design

How To Avoid Web Design Mistakes That Interfere With Usability

This is a guest post by Jessica Velasco.

If you are new to the design field, creating a website may seem a daunting task. There are so many things to consider; you’re probably worrying about your clients’ requests, the aesthetic feeling you hope to induce, and tons of other creative nuances. However, the real challenge is combining all these requirements in a website that is usable.

If you are a veteran designer, you already know how important the usability of a website is. Yet, for both rookies and veterans, it can be easy to slip into the creative mode and disregard the true purpose of web design – to meet the needs of the users.
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Screen shot 2012-05-21 at 2.05.28 PM Demo UX Cases

User Experience Report: The 2012 Presidential Candidates’ Home Pages

The impending 2012 US presidential election looms closer every week, and offers an excellent opportunity to take a good look at the home pages of the two primary candidates: Democrat incumbent President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

We created a visual Usabilla survey to benchmark the home pages of the two presidential candidates against each other. We focussed on the user experience and usability similarities and differences of the candidate websites. The feedback of our test participants led to interesting findings and helped us to understand how the home pages of the two leading candidates for the 2012 US Presidential Election differ from other websites.

Read on for the highlights of this interesting UX case study, or download the full report.
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featured Design

6 Guidelines For Designing 404 Error Pages With A Positive Impact

It goes without saying that the best way to go about errors is to avoid them. People neither have the time nor the nerves to deal with technical problems, while browsing your site with a certain goal in mind. So you should do everything in your power to avoid errors.

Yet, there is little you can do about the unexpected. No matter how hard you try, some users will run into a dead end at some point. It might or not be your fault, but you should be prepared for when it happens.

Customized 404 error pages have become the rule. We see them almost every time that we try to visit a broken or non-existing link. Webmasters have realized that classic 404 error messages can have a negative impact on the user experience. They are negatively phrased, boring and for most people too technical to truly understand. Customized error pages on the other hand can have a positive impact.
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230511073747usability_testing Theory

Combining In-Person and Remote Research

This article was originally and in full length published on UX Magazine.

In the early 90’s, Jakob Nielsen declared in-person user research as state of the art. “User testing with real users is the most fundamental usability method and is in some sense irreplaceable, since it provides direct information about how people use computers [...]”. Sometimes in-person user research can be logistically impractical or cost prohibitive, so remote user research is often employed as an alternative.

In-person user research has been around the longest, and is still widely used as a great way to gather feedback on websites, advertisements, or software. In-person research usually involves letting users perform tasks on a computer while asking them questions, observing their behaviors and body language, or having them think out loud.

In remote user research, on the other hand, the physical location is no longer important because the research subjects can work independently of the researchers. There are two forms of remote user research: moderated and automated. Moderated tests require the researcher to interact with the participant during the session. During automated tests, the researcher does not interfere, which allows people to participate whenever it fits their personal schedule.
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featured Links

Our 5 Favorite Articles On UX (May 2012)

As community manager and writer at Usabilla, I stumble over quite a number of interesting articles every day. Whenever I read something interesting, I tweet or retweet it in the hope that more people will see and enjoy it. Now, twitter can be a tricky thing. People easily miss your stuff, especially if you are not persistent enough to tweet the same link over and over.

Today it’s the last day of the month and we would like to share with you our favorite articles from this month. Let me give you just a brief summary on each of them and then let you decide for yourself if they are worth your time. I bet they are, though.
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ford_featured Design

Usability Has Become A Commodity

  • Heretical or not, it is time to have more pleasure and enjoyment in life. Although the cognitive analyses of usability and function are important, so too is the affective analysis. Let the future of everyday things be ones that do their job, that are easy to use, and that provide enjoyment and pleasure.

– Don Norman

I couldn’t say it any better than Don Norman. There is no questions that the usability of a user interface (UI) will continue to be essential for the success of a product. Only due to technological progress and common usability standards, people will be more likely to notice its absence rather than its presence. Usability has become a commodity and is no longer a distinctive feature. Something less tangible has taken its place: The user experience.

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