Tag Archives: usability test

Time to Learn - Clock Theory

If You Don’t Learn, You Might As Well Not Test

This is a guest post by our friend Richard de Vries.

The most popular way of optimizing a website is by A/B testing it. For some reason the bigger the website gets, the harder it becomes to test. If you are dealing with optimization in a big company there is a fair chance you will recognize this. Putting up with rules and regulations, trying to get everyone involved and not getting people to agree upon what to test are just a few of the many things you will run into. The easiest way to solve this is to avoid working for big companies and only work for startups. However if you change your approach to testing, you might be able to create some magic, even in a big company.
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btd69r708tp Theory

A Cry For Looking To Other Methods For User Centered Design

This guest post is written by our friend Tristan Weevers.

In 2004 and in 2005, Neville Stanton wrote two books with 200 methods and tools for Human Factors. In 2010, Chauncey Wilson added another 100 specific for user-centred design (UCD). In addition to books like these, people started to collect methods online. I found a lot of them, some better than others. However, it seems that no one really uses these collections, or even knows about them.

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Screen shot 2012-04-24 at 5.14.56 PM Design

Different Ways To Approach User Centred Design

User testing. Everyone knows it, everyone does it, or at least knows he should be doing it when creating user interfaces. Over time many different kinds of user testing, such as classic in-lab user testing, remote, or automated user testing, have evolved. They are all based on the same idea: user centred design. And they all have their advantages and their disadvantages. Let’s look into different approaches to user centred design and how the saying ‘many a little makes a mickle’ applies to automated remote user testing.

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5 Effective Ways for Usability Testing to Play Nice with Agile Design

5 Effective Ways for Usability Testing to Play Nice with Agile

Usability testing has been a fundamental tool in the UX arsenal for decades now. The value of actually meeting your customers and letting them experience your product makes a significant impact to the shape of that product. In it’s most formal version, testing can be a multi-day, multi-thousand $/€ process that delivers final analysis days if not weeks later. With many organizations moving to an Agile philosophy and methodology, UX practitioners are finding it difficult to integrate formal usability testing into this faster-paced, iterative approach to software development.

See? Lions and zebras can get along. So, too, can Agile and Usability Testing.

See? Lions and zebras can get along. So, too, can Agile and Usability Testing.

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Screen shot 2013-01-02 at 10.44.06 AM Theory

Usability Testing With Children: A Lesson From Piaget

Children are becoming an increasingly important target group on the web. Good usability and high user experience are crucial aspects for a successful website. Early and repetitive user testing is the way to go. If we address children on our website, we need to focus on what they want. We need to include children as a target group in our user testing.

In this post I’d like to take a look at usability testing with different age groups. First, let’s have a look at the question-answer process to understand the importance of cognitive abilities. I will then briefly introduce Piaget’s theory of cognitive growth and explain how it can be useful for usability testing with children. What can we learn from a widely recognized scientist from the beginning of the twentieth century?

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The perfect hyperlink: choose your words carefully Demo UX Cases

The perfect hyperlink: choose your words carefully

People often don’t read webpages, but scan them. Good experience designers know this and take good care to provide the user with a clean headline and a prominent call to action. Great experience designers go a step further and adjust their copywriting and links to aid in the scanning. By striking a balance between informative and intriguing wording, people will be enticed to keep reading or explore the rest of the site. Some people will even do both!

Figure 1 - Subject of study - Nescafé

We wanted to test this for ourselves. How will users react to different worded hyperlinks in an otherwise identical website? Have a look at the remote test we have set up.

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Test before you spend: simple early stage user testing Design

Test before you spend: simple early stage user testing

An astonishing design, wide content, and innovative interactive elements might be of no use if not focused on the future user. The actual users foreknowledge, needs, and interests must be met to offer both a satisfying source of information and positive user experience. This sounds complicated, but really, user centred design is just a matter of the right approach. The key is to start user testing early…

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3 hours, 4 tools, 1 test: +19% conversion rate Demo UX Cases

3 hours, 4 tools, 1 test: +19% conversion rate

There are many many online tools out there that help you test and improve almost any aspect of your website. It can be very convenient to not only look at these tools separately, but to combine their advantages into one single test. Matthew Niederberger, a specialist when it comes to online optimization, shares his experience with such an ‘hybrid’ test case on his blog actualinsights.com. We are very happy to get some great insights about how Matthew set up a complete usabillity test in only three hours combining Usabilla with Wufoo, Kampyle, and Mailchimp. Aim of the test was to find out about users preferences for different design variations.

 

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