Tag Archives: improvements

Screen shot 2012-07-06 at 1.43.02 PM Demo UX Cases

Five Things You Can Test Under Five Minutes

Lets dish out some quick ways to test and improve your product. Long tests with a lot of tasks certainly can have their place (for example in the early stages of a design). However, many of our customers are improving their website by running multiple, recurring, and short tests.

Recurring tests are easy to setup and manage. They are of the ‘set and forget’ type. Participating only takes a couple of minutes and is fun to do. It’s also a good example of agile design: small improvements can be made to the existing product quickly. Can’t you just taste the low hanging fruit?

On to the examples!

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Re-order your test pages Announcements

Re-order your test pages

Designing your tests just got a bit easier: you can re-arrange pages in the Test detail tab now. Just click the Move up ↑ or Move down ↓ buttons at the top right corner of every page-section of your test. Here, take a look:

Move your testpages up and down in the test details tab

Shuffle your testpages around in the test details tab

We hope you enjoy this improvement, and as always we appreciate any and all feedback. Feel free to leave a comment below or tweet us any suggestions or questions at @usabilla.

Improvements in the test interface Announcements

Improvements in the test interface

One of our most important focus points is the usability of our own test interface. Participating in a Usabilla test must be simple, fun, and way more exciting than a standard survey. In the past year we’ve released about 15 iterations on our test interface. Each iteration was based on feedback from participants, users, and experts using Usabilla. We’ve just released a small update and we think this update solves the most important usability issues of our test interface.

Problem: Participants don’t have a clue that they can add notes.

Usabilla is primary a quantitative tool. Notes add a qualitative aspect to the tests and are of in many cases of great help to interpret test results.  If you run a test case with for example 250 participants and all those 250 participants add 20 points with notes, your ‘lean & mean’ test is probably no longer ‘lean & mean’. This is the reason why we focus on points as primary response and notes as secondary. Unfortunately in our previous releases we didn’t manage to find a good balance between these two interactions.

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