Tag Archives: Design

featured Design

Well Designed Product Pages

When working on an ecommerce site, one of the places sapping lots of time and energy is in getting the product page to be just right. There are a number of elements that tend to perform well on product pages, by giving potential customers useful information and by showcasing the product well. Yet there are some that make for a better, more useful product page. As a result, making for happier customers.

So, without further ado, let’s have a look at some of the features that improve product pages.
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google skeominimalism Theory

The Skeuomorph is Dead, Long Live the Skeuomorph

2013 saw a new king of design take the throne. This has been the year of Flat Design. 2012 ended with Microsoft bringing Flat to the mainstream with Windows 8, and Apple revamped iOS a year later. Casting away their skeuomorphic principles of old and refreshing the interface with a Flat approach.

As one of the defining design events of the year, this exemplified the changing trend of digital design. Apple, formerly so staunch in their support for skeuomorphic design under Steve Jobs, opting for the popular kid.
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featured Design

Contact Pages – Good vs Bad

A thought-through contact section or page is critical to the success of your website. Why? Simply because visitors – be it your current or potential clients – will more than likely want to contact you at some point. And when they do, you better make it a positive experience for them. Even though your interaction is probably going to be mediated, it is important to make your visitors feel welcome, understood, and appreciated.
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2012_10_featured_product_pages Design

Better Product Pages: Turn Visitors Into Customers

The way you present your product or service is essential to its success — or at least it could be if you know how to do it right. On the Web, like anywhere else, the first impression you make on people is crucial. When selling a product, you want that first impression to be as positive and remarkable as possible.

Once people visit your website, make sure to attract their attention. If you have managed to draw them in, you will need to introduce the product within a few seconds. According to last year’s Google Analytics benchmarking report, bounce rates in the US were as high as 42.5 percent. If people don’t understand what you are offering them or how it works, they will lose interest quickly. Show them that your product is just what they want, that it’s useful and that it adds some kind of value to their lives.
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2012_08_07_featured Theory

Wireframes: From Bar Napkins To Prototypes

This is a guest post by our friend Mike Hughes

Some of my best ideas were conceived and communicated using a sharpie and a bar napkin. Unfortunately, some of my best ideas were obliterated by a sweaty beer glass.

I’ve also walked into conceptual reviews with exquisitely detailed, working prototypes only to have the review go something like this:
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2012_07_02_featured Theory

Why The User Experience Can Or Cannot Be Designed

This is a guest post by our friend Paul Olyslager.

It seems an endless discussion whether the user experience can or cannot be designed. The difficulty of the discussion lies in the level of abstraction. I believe that is because everything is an experience and everyone is a user. There is no standard definition, nor consensus among the practitioners, of what experience design really is.

In this article I hope to shed some light on the issue. I will share my thoughts about the difficulties to design the user experience and give some practical tips how to overcome this challenge.
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visceral_design Design

Not Just Pretty: Building Emotion Into Your Websites

This article was originally and in full length published on Smashing Magazine. Please visit the original source for the entire text, including many visual examples.

Emotional design has become a powerful tool in creating exceptional user experiences for websites. However, emotions did not use to play such an important role on the Web. Actually, they did not use to play any role at all; rather, they were drowned by a flood of rational functionality and efficiency.

We were so busy trying to adapt to the World Wide Web as a new medium that we lost sight of its full potential. Instead of using the Internet on our terms, we adapted to its technical and, at first, impersonal nature. If it wasn’t for visionary contemporaries such as Don Norman or Aarron Walter, we might still be focusing on improving processes, neglecting the potential of emotional design.
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86754321 Theory

Useful, Saleable, Buildable: The Role Of UX In Defining Requirements

This is a guest post by our friend Mike Hughes.

A mentor of mine is fond of giving the advice “Do what you love to do in the service of those who love what you do.” Whenever I hear UX professionals complain that they are continually having to promote the value of what they do, I wonder if they are serving the right people. If people in your organization are not seeing the value you add, maybe you haven’t positioned yourself where you can add the most value.

In this article I’ll explain how my role has evolved from that of a usability expert to that of a user experience (UX) architect. In making that transition, I have increased my impact on product strategy and I have established a higher perceived value in the organizations I work for. Essentially, I will discuss how my emphasis and contribution has shifted from just making the product usable, to defining a product that is useful, saleable, and buildable.

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