Tag Archives: demo

Screen-shot-2012-05-25-at-8.58.39-AM Demo UX Cases

A Smashing Redesign

Given that we love everything UX and design related, it must come as no surprise we are big fan of Smashing Magazine. Their choice of subjects is always spot on, and their articles show an impressive amount of attention to detail. They recently had their site redesigned, and the result is a beautiful, spacious site, designed from the typography out.

I took a closer look at the new design and I’d like to discuss some of the findings with you. I will not speak only based on my own observations however: I set up a Usabilla design feedback test among 30-some of our loyal followers.1 They pointed out which elements they like on the homepage and which they would like to improve, and elaborated on both tasks by leaving notes. In total, I got 220 notes placed on an image of the new Smashing Magazine homepage.

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Submitting form data to a Usabilla test How-tos

Submitting form data to a Usabilla test

Not so long ago we’ve added ‘custom variables’ to our tests. We store every variable you specify in the URL of your test and include these variables and an unique participant id (pid) in your redirect URL. That might sound a bit complicated, but enables you to store additional data for individual participants in Usabilla and to pass through data to other services as well. Let me try to explain with a simple example using a web form to submit data to a Usabilla test:

A simple web form

You can submit a simple web form to a Usabilla test. If you use ‘GET’ as method, the fields in your form are submitted as URL encoded variables. Example:

<form method="get" id="screener" name="screener" action="http://usabilla.com/rate/15927259904cb5afe7f3c00"> 	
	<label for="name">Name:</label> 
	<input id="name" name="name" type="text" /> 
	<label for="group">Group:</label> 
	<select id="group" name="group"> 
		<option value="A">A</option> 
		<option value="B">B</option> 
	</select> 
	<input type="submit" value="Submit" /> 
</form>
<form method=”get” id=”screener” name=”screener” action=”http://usabilla.com/rate/15927259904cb5afe7f3c00″>
<label for=”name”>Name:</label>
<input id=”name” name=”name” type=”text” />
<label for=”group”>Group:</label>
<select id=”group” name=”group”>
<option value=”A”>A</option>
<option value=”B”>B</option>
</select>
<input type=”submit” value=”Submit” />
</form>

This example form submits two variables (name and group) to a Usabilla test. The form input is stored together with the test data of your participant. At the end of the test the variables will also be attached to the redirect URL. This redirect URL could be another survey as well: read about combining Usabilla with a PollDaddy survey.

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Call-to-Action: benchmarking 10 web services Demo UX Cases

Call-to-Action: benchmarking 10 web services

The sign up button or link is an important call-to-action on the homepages of most web services. In a recent demo case Usabilla compared the sign up on the homepages of 10 different web services. Users found the sign up button on the Twitter homepage in 1.8 seconds. Animoto was a good runner up with 2.3 seconds. On average it took participants 3.5 seconds to find a way to sign up for these web services.

The differences between the performance of these websites on this important task are big. But what makes Twitter homepage stand out in this test? Why do the sign up buttons at Animoto, Vimeo and MyNameisE catch attention faster than those of Wakoopa, Basecamp, and PayPal? We would love to hear your opinion about these test results.

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First testcase: The Next Web 2009 Announcements

First testcase: The Next Web 2009

The past months we’ve been working on a prototype for our online usability testsuite. The enthousiasm and efforts of our team are beginning to pay off. We’re making big progress on the both the backend and frontend.

Last week we kicked off with a basic test of our frontend and asked users to give their feedback on the website of The Next Web 2009. With the help of some early beta subscribers we collected an interesting dataset, which can be used to optimize our analysis. We could still use some extra input from others, so if you’re curious and want to be one of the first to start your own simple usability test in the future: sign up for our beta.

Usabilla - Feedback for The Next Web 2009