A blog about visual design, analytics, usability, user experience, and remote research.

jams1 Theory

Juggling Jam: Applying Hick’s Law to Web Design

Choice is a strange thing. The decisions we make shape everything we do, everything we are.

We deem choice a luxury. Liberating people with added choice was the running theme of the last century. Giving women the choice to vote. Removing racial segregations, opening up a plethora of choices for minorities across the world.

It seems only logical then to presume that offering an increased amount of choice is a great thing. Liberating people, allowing them to choose exactly what they want.

You’d be wrong.
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featured How-tos

How to Crack The Code to an Intuitive Landing Page

A Landing Page can make or break your website – it’s the first thing your visitors engage with when they visit your site. It can determine if they stay around to read more, or close the window without ever looking back.

That being said, it’s very important to come up with a well-designed, well-written, visitor-oriented and intuitive Landing Page. One that will serve as the ‘Business Card’ of your website. It should be so reflective of your business/product, that you’d carry a small version of it around in your pocket – handing it out at parties to other professionals.
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observational Design

5 New Interesting UX Phrases

The latest instalment in our monthly list of User Experience terms and definitions.

Each month, we are adding new terms to our existing glossary of Web Design, Usability and UX definitions; terms we deem useful, interesting or – hopefully – a mixture of the two!

Discover new terms, learn more of the ones you thought you knew and find out interesting, little known, details.
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featured Links

The Best UX Articles of February 2014

With spring slowly arriving earlier than ever, we can finally start spending more of our time outside. As you’ve been rejoicing outside in the sporadic showers or rare glimpse of a cloudless sky, you could be forgiven for not keeping up with the constant stream of great content.

So, with so much quality content out there, we take one more look back at February 2014. We’ve compiled February’s best 5 articles we feel are interesting, invaluable or otherwise a must read for anyone with an interest in UX.
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featured Design

Well Designed Product Pages

When working on an ecommerce site, one of the places sapping lots of time and energy is in getting the product page to be just right. There are a number of elements that tend to perform well on product pages, by giving potential customers useful information and by showcasing the product well. Yet there are some that make for a better, more useful product page. As a result, making for happier customers.

So, without further ado, let’s have a look at some of the features that improve product pages.
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Unusual_01 How-tos

How to Stand Out from the Crowd: Unusual Web Design

In general, we don’t want to look unusual.

We want to stand out, sure, but for being successful. Just like the football hero, winning the final game with the winning touchdown.

We don’t want to stand out for looking unusual or being unique, because we’re afraid of being different from everyone else and being outcasted as a result.
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Squarespace Theory

How Google thinks a top rated site should look

The development of SEO and Google’s algorithms is interconnected and interdependent. Every change Google makes to its searching algorithm affects search results in some way. Everything Google has done since 2011 is focused on secure search, protecting their data and online privacy, and, let’s be honest, monetizing their data. “Pandas”, “Penguins”, “Hummingbirds” and Graph Carousel are a part of a long-term multicomponent strategy. They show that the results of searching become more complicated and relevant, not limited to one query.

Google has its idea of what top websites should look like, and people in SEO either follow Google’s prescriptions or try to overcome the algorithm. They improve technologies and Google reacts by changing their algorithms. In response, marketing strategies must change to adapt these new search algorithms. And the process continues.
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