Category Archives: Demo UX Cases

Usabilla Report: The UX of 18 leading travel websites Demo UX Cases

Usabilla Report: The UX of 18 leading travel websites

Summer finally hit Amsterdam. In the vacation high season we decided to devote our very first quarterly user experience report to the travel sector. We lined up a total of 18 travel sites in three different categories (hotels, airlines, and comparison sites) and invited 800 participants to give feedback and perform simple tasks.

Report: UX in the Travel Sector (cover)Screenshot: Shatner made quite an impression on Priceline.com

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Do you trust me? Assessing Web credibility Demo UX Cases

Do you trust me? Assessing Web credibility

Trust keeps coming back as one of the most important factors in the user experience of websites. We delve deeper in the theory of credibility impact by B.J. Fogg and team up with our office neighbors Springest to shed light on the credibility of homepages in the Learning & Development sector. Let us show you how to use simple guidelines to ensure your sites are designed for credibility—they are easy to implement and they definitely payoff.

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Perfectly worded hyperlinks equals better usability and conversion Demo UX Cases

Perfectly worded hyperlinks equals better usability and conversion

A little while ago I devoted myself to the wording of hyperlinks. I set up a case study in order to find out if wording influences our users’ action, success rates, and their perception of our website. We tested three versions of the ‘About NESCAFÉ’ page, with generic, informative, and intriguing wording. Results show that generic and informative wording increased the chance of finding information, while the intriguing wording was more catchy and appealing.

Figure 1 - Informative version, interesting elements


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The Vampire Effect: Sucking attention away from content Demo UX Cases

The Vampire Effect: Sucking attention away from content

Senior drama critic at The New Yorker John Lahr once exclaimed:

“Society drives people crazy with lust and calls it advertising”

Does this craziness translate into sales? Can sexual stimuli interfere with the effectiveness of an ad? After all, most of us like to look at sexy models in sexy lingerie, don’t we? Let me show you how a remote test can shed light on these questions.

Lavazza's titillating ad

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Screen shot 2012-07-06 at 1.43.02 PM Demo UX Cases

Five Things You Can Test Under Five Minutes

Lets dish out some quick ways to test and improve your product. Long tests with a lot of tasks certainly can have their place (for example in the early stages of a design). However, many of our customers are improving their website by running multiple, recurring, and short tests.

Recurring tests are easy to setup and manage. They are of the ‘set and forget’ type. Participating only takes a couple of minutes and is fun to do. It’s also a good example of agile design: small improvements can be made to the existing product quickly. Can’t you just taste the low hanging fruit?

On to the examples!

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The perfect hyperlink: choose your words carefully Demo UX Cases

The perfect hyperlink: choose your words carefully

People often don’t read webpages, but scan them. Good experience designers know this and take good care to provide the user with a clean headline and a prominent call to action. Great experience designers go a step further and adjust their copywriting and links to aid in the scanning. By striking a balance between informative and intriguing wording, people will be enticed to keep reading or explore the rest of the site. Some people will even do both!

Figure 1 - Subject of study - Nescafé

We wanted to test this for ourselves. How will users react to different worded hyperlinks in an otherwise identical website? Have a look at the remote test we have set up.

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Book a cheap ticket: how four sites score on usability Demo UX Cases

Book a cheap ticket: how four sites score on usability

How many times have you tried to book a ticket online and got frustrated by all the options and the cluttered information? Though travel sites embrace the importance of usability and constantly try to improve their sites, still they often fail to deliver a great customer experience (reference). The reason, in many cases, is that the goals  of the travel site and that of the user conflict. You might be stressfully looking for a last-minute ticket to see your loved one, while the travel site wants to sell you a package of vacations to Mallorca. It’s not the right moment, but the travel website unfortunately doesn’t know it, and craves to convert… Result? FAIL!

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