Category Archives: Theory

glossary2 Theory

Usabilla UX Index – Fogg’s Behaviour model, Lean UX, Colour Theory and more…

Here we are again with another 5 words to update your vocabulary just in time for christmas.

Each month we continue to add new terms to our existing collection of Usability and UX definitions; terms we deem useful, interesting or – hopefully – a mixture of the two!

Discover something new, refresh your memory of the ones you thought you knew and find out interesting, little known, details.
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Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 13.06.48 Theory

3 Ways In Which Fluency Psychology Will Shake Up Usability Design

As usability professionals, we love to understand what makes a website or interface ‘feel’ right. While usability testing remains an indispensable tool in ironing out our interface’s bottlenecks, new insights into the ways in which people process information are always welcome. What brain circuits are sparked when someone interacts with our work? And how do these processes guide further courses of action?

Currently, one of cognitive psychology’s most treasured topics is processing fluency. It’s a simple concept, yet amazingly powerful in creating interfaces that work. Let’s dig in.
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ghv Theory

What Can Children Teach Us About UX Design?

On Wednesday afternoon we launched our new webinar series – Usabilla On Air – the first episode titled “What Can Children Teach Us About UX Design?’. If you’re unaware of Usabilla on Air we aim to produce one webinar a month, each with a different design theme and discussion with an expert in that field. All episodes will then remain on Youtube, so if you didn’t manage to catch it live you can still view Wednesday’s episode here in full.
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glossary Theory

Usabilla UX Index – Kano, Occam, Gestalt and more…

The ABC of Usability has resurfaced, although you may notice a few changes. Now known as UX Index, the concept is still the same and we’ve provided five fresh new phrases to learn. Each month we will continue to add five words to our existing collection of Usability and UX definitions which we hope you’ll find both interesting and useful.
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featured Design

Flat Design was just a Trend, Apparently

There is no doubting Flat design is the current darling of the design world. Flat, simple patterns provide a clean and fresh look. Minimalist designs perfectly adapted to the surge in mobile usage. Even a company like Apple, a longtime supporter of skeuomorphic design, has joined their contemporaries in the design switch up.

Flat design burst onto the scene in late 2012, heralding a new era for design. Windows proved the vanguard for these new principles. Implementing their Metro interface first on Xbox and Zune, before unveiling Flat to the world with Windows 8. The Windows shake up carried with it plenty of controversies, yet Flat Design has only grown from strength to strength.
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featured Theory

Consistency Counts: Never Forget Your User

“Reinventing the wheel” is a common trend in the UX field, as is it within the majority of creative disciplines. Keen designers want to leave their mark; to prove their creativity and talent through fresh concepts. Fair play to them. How else are we to ensure trends evolve and continue to keep us interested and excited?

UX however, is a strange beast. A place where boundless creativity must be kept in check. Where any hint of misplaced arrogance can, and will, break a design; where “Reinventing the Wheel” is a trap best avoided. UX is about consistency.
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trafficlights Design

Idiot Buttons: The Placebo in UX Design

Users love control. Even in an automated world, our user wants to control the machine. To know that it is under their bidding, and to know it is serving their needs.

Yet, in an age of ever more intuitive interfaces, control is slipping out of the user’s hands. Reduced inputs leave our user only a bystander.

The placebo prevents this. The placebo places control back into our users hands. Yet, the placebo does nothing.
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armour_sets Theory

User Engagement: Learning from World of Warcraft

World of Warcraft will be 10 years old this year. Having dominated the gaming landscape this past decade, and with a new expansion due later this year, it is difficult to see any sign of major decline on the landscape. With over 6 million players, (down from a peak 12 million in 2010), WoW – its common acronym – continues to draw more than triple the players of its nearest rival. With each of these players paying around $15/month for the privilege, the numbers are huge.
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ID-10069792 Theory

Innovation and Usability: Striking a Balance

In a sense, success in online or software product management comes down to one word: innovation.
Discovering and implementing ideas is what drives success. The very word “innovation” is on the rise; as a recent comparison by Scott Burkun shows, the word “has undergone a steady and sharp increase in its appearance in print formats over the last fifty years”.

But does innovation come at a cost? Innovations can only be useful if they reach customers. And the key to reaching, and onboarding, these customers, is not only innovation – it’s usability.

New and returning users of your product don’t want to deal with constant updates or fixes – they want a product that works. If they already know how to use the service, they don’t want to have to learn something new.

So how to balance innovation with usability?
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