Author Archives: Richard de Vries

Richard de Vries

Richard de Vries works as a freelance UX designer at architecto.nl and makes an idea into a website every week with 400minutes.com Follow the author on Twitter
2013_01_featured_richard Theory

Think Outside The Box, But Design Within The Framework

As a UX designer I used to get frustrated when I had the feeling my designs didn’t really get built in the fashion I designed it. That’s the reason why I started to explore the way my UX designs get built. I learned about agile & lean, but also a lot of code. My biggest lesson so far: Think outside the box, but design within the framework.

In this post I would like to discuss different frameworks that impact our work as UX designers. I also would like to explain which frameworks you can use and how you can use them to create better user experiences.
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2012_11_architecture_featured Theory

18 Design Lessons You Can Learn From Architecture

This is a guest post by Richard de Vries

Every medium has its architect. When we talk about brick and mortar it’s an architect, when the medium is film, it’s a director and for printed media it’s the editor in chief. For interactive media, I believe the architect is the interaction designer. With that belief, I try to get inspired by architecture in my work as an interaction designer. So when I stumbled upon “101 Things I learned in Architecture School” by Matthew Frederick I immediately bought it.
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Time to Learn - Clock Theory

If You Don’t Learn, You Might As Well Not Test

This is a guest post by our friend Richard de Vries.

The most popular way of optimizing a website is by A/B testing it. For some reason the bigger the website gets, the harder it becomes to test. If you are dealing with optimization in a big company there is a fair chance you will recognize this. Putting up with rules and regulations, trying to get everyone involved and not getting people to agree upon what to test are just a few of the many things you will run into. The easiest way to solve this is to avoid working for big companies and only work for startups. However if you change your approach to testing, you might be able to create some magic, even in a big company.
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Learn To Code And Take Your Designs One Step Further Design

Learn To Code And Take Your Designs One Step Further

I can remember a presentation in 2007 from Jonathan Arnowitz with the title Innovation and Design in a World of Engineering. In his presentation Jonathan warns us about the quality of a design process within an engineering environment. He also points out the differences between developers and designers. When I saw this presentation I couldn’t agree more. I think this was because I noticed that a lot of professionals with a developers mindset were calling themselves designers. Or even worse, a devigner, which often meant that they were neither good at programming nor at designing.

Source: http://sixrevisions.com/infographs/web-designers-vs-web-developers/


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Screen shot 2012-06-27 at 3.17.23 PM Theory

Anyone Can Design, Only a Few Can Be Good

Design has never been more accessible than at this moment, and design is getting more and more accessible. Not only are design tools more user friendly, design thinking is a skill-set that is used from call agents to CEO’s. This is a very good thing, it makes that almost everything we see, hear, feel, taste or use is designed. As a designer this makes me happy.

What doesn’t make me happy, is a bad design. Which is exactly the downfall of the design age we live in, everything is designed, but only a few things are designed by actual designers. And you can tell when it’s not designed by a designer, even if it’s not that poor.

A good designer is ethical by definition

Image source: http://darkpatterns.org

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One simple question to get to the root of any design problem Design

One simple question to get to the root of any design problem

I believe that the difference between a good and a poor UX designer is that a good UX designer finds out all the questions a user has and answers them well in his design. A poor UX designer creates a design that actually raises more questions than it solves. Let me explain a method I use to get to the good questions.

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